Monday, March 14, 2011

How "matched domestic adoption" works...

Well as of right now just to recap, Michael's squadron will be closing this time next year so we can't accept foster children b/c we may have to move if he doesn't get hired on with the other local squadron. We decided to leave our name on the "matched adoption" list, and that way if a child whose parents have relinquished all rights comes up for adoption we would be able to complete the adoption before we have to leave. Well since that time we've been contacted about 4 children but each time either CPS went with another family or we opted out of selection for that particular child.
Once again our family has made it to the "selection hearing" and what that means is that based upon our "profile" CPS has accepted us as one of the "finalist families" (my quotes here) for a 1 year old AA boy. We receive a one page summary of his history and medical status and can at that time opt to have our homestudy submitted or with held for the hearing. So on the 17th each agency will send a representative to speak for their prospective adoptive family and together with CPS they try and make the best placement for the child (hence "matching" the child with a family).
Once the family is chosen they will then be able to read the full case report for the child and together with their case manager decide whether or not it will be a good "match". Then if you decide to proceed with the adoption I think you get the child in your home within 4 weeks of accepting their referral. Total adoption time is 6 months until court where the child then is officially adopted and has their name changed.
(I could be wrong on some of the timeline here but I think it's darn close)
The best part of "matched adoption" is the cost. We pay court fees ONLY which is typically $800 - $1000.
I really would encourage everyone to consider "matched" domestic adoption. Private adoption can be just as expensive as international adoption but "matched adoption" is a great option. Most of these children are available because their parents are in jail, have had children removed from their care in the past, or are in some type of treatment facility. Again all of these children already have parental rights terminated so there's no worry of them getting taken back by their parents.
So we'll see what happens on the 17th!

1 comment:

Mie said...

Good luck! I know so many friends who went this route rather than deal with the pain of letting kiddos go. We have let 3 of our 6 kiddos go and will definitely let the newest 2 go soon with plans to adopt the remaining 1. All said in a year we will have given back 5/6 kids that have lived in our home. That hasn't been hard for us (see my blog for more) but last Friday we faced our first "staffing" where we were considered for an adoptive placement like you've described. Needless to say we weren't selected and that really, really sucked for us. I'm not sure I could handle that for a long time, but I think we were made for foster care. Good luck!